cover-1A new book Developments in Electrochemistry: Science Inspired by Martin Fleischmann has been published by John Wiley.

From the description:

Martin Fleischmann was truly one of the ‘fathers’ of modern electrochemistry having made major contributions to diverse topics within electrochemical science and technology. These include the theory and practice of voltammetry and in situ spectroscopic techniques, instrumentation, electrochemical phase formation, corrosion, electrochemical engineering, electrosynthesis and cold fusion.

While intended to honour the memory of Martin Fleischmann, Developments in Electrochemistry is neither a biography nor a history of his contributions. Rather, the book is a series of critical reviews of topics in electrochemical science associated with Martin Fleischmann but remaining important today. The authors are all scientists with outstanding international reputations who have made their own contribution to their topic; most have also worked with Martin Fleischmann and benefitted from his guidance.

Each of the 19 chapters within this volume begin with an outline of Martin Fleischmann’s contribution to the topic, followed by examples of research, established applications and prospects for future developments.

The book is of interest to both students and experienced workers in universities and industry who are active in developing electrochemical science.

Nineteen chapters survey a host of topics in Electrochemistry, a field Fleischmann dominated with skills that put him at the top of a talented group. Chapter 13 looks at his work in cold fusion and is written by electrochemists Dr. Melvin Miles, a now-retired Navy scientist, and Dr. Michael McKubre of SRI International, both of whom collaborated with Fleischmann for over a decade.

The chapter’s contents focus on heat measurements, a seemingly simple operation that proves to be much more difficult in practice.

13 Cold Fusion After A Quarter-Century: The Pd/D System 245
by Melvin H. Miles and Michael C.H. McKubre

13.1 The Reproducibility Issue 247
13.2 Palladium–Deuterium Loading 247
13.3 Electrochemical Calorimetry 249
13.4 Isoperibolic Calorimetric Equations and Modeling 250
13.5 Calorimetric Approximations 251
13.6 Numerical Integration of Calorimetric Data 252
13.7 Examples of Fleischmann’s Calorimetric Applications 254
13.8 Reported Reaction Products for the Pd/D System 256
13.8.1 Helium-4 256
13.8.2 Tritium 256
13.8.3 Neutrons, X-Rays, and Transmutations 257
13.9 Present Status of Cold Fusion 257
Acknowledgments 258
References 258

“No one knew calorimetry better than Martin Fleischmann,” says Miles. “He could do things that no one else could do, no one in the world.”

“I believe the chapters in this book will also show Martin’s unusual skill with mathematics. This skill is also shown in the calorimetric equations that he developed for cold fusion and his unmatched ability for the analysis of the calorimetric data,” adds Miles. “I hope the cold fusion chapter in this book will help others to appreciate that Martin’s greatness as a scientist carried over into his work on the palladium/ deuterium system.”

McKubre agrees. “Martin Fleischmann’s name is associated with more innovation in Electrochemistry than any other individual – in the schools where I was trained he was worshiped as a founding father.”

That assessment is a far cry from former-American Physical Society Information Officer/Spokesman Robert Park who derided Fleischmann’s contribution, along with that of his University of Utah research partner Dr. Stanley Pons, saying in the documentary film The Believers, “this was not their field”, and claiming Fleischmann‘s career was based “on one experiment and not much else.”

Science Inspired reveals the wide and influential scope of Fleischmann’s work before the scientific question of the century eclipsed all other research, and after. Read Chapter 1 Martin Fleischmann: The Scientist and the Person compliments of google books here.

Table of Contents

List of Contributors xiii

1 Martin Fleischmann – The Scientist and the Person 1

2 A Critical Review of the Methods Available for Quantitative Evaluation of Electrode Kinetics at Stationary Macrodisk Electrodes 21
Alan M. Bond, Elena A. Mashkina and Alexandr N. Simonov

2.1 DC Cyclic Voltammetry 23

2.1.1 Principles 23

2.1.2 Processing DC Cyclic Voltammetric Data 26

2.1.3 Semiintegration 29

2.2 AC Voltammetry 32

2.2.1 Advanced Methods of Theory–Experiment Comparison 35

2.3 Experimental Studies 36

2.3.1 Reduction of [Ru(NH3)6]3+ in an Aqueous Medium 36

2.3.2 Oxidation of FeII(C5H5)2 in an Aprotic Solvent 40

2.3.3 Reduction of [Fe(CN)6]3− in an Aqueous Electrolyte 42

2.4 Conclusions and Outlook 43

References 45

3 Electrocrystallization: Modeling and Its Application 49
Morteza Y. Abyaneh

3.1 Modeling Electrocrystallization Processes 53

3.2 Applications of Models 56

3.2.1 The Deposition of Lead Dioxide 58

3.2.2 The Electrocrystallization of Cobalt 60

3.3 Summary and Conclusions 61

References 63

4 Nucleation and Growth of New Phases on Electrode Surfaces 65
Benjamin R. Scharifker and Jorge Mostany

4.1 An Overview of Martin Fleischmann’s Contributions to Electrochemical Nucleation Studies 66

4.2 Electrochemical Nucleation with Diffusion-Controlled Growth 67

4.3 Mathematical Modeling of Nucleation and Growth Processes 68

4.4 The Nature of Active Sites 69

4.5 Induction Times and the Onset of Electrochemical Phase Formation Processes 71

4.6 Conclusion 72

References 72

5 Organic Electrosynthesis 77
Derek Pletcher

5.1 Indirect Electrolysis 79

5.2 Intermediates for Families of Reactions 80

5.3 Selective Fluorination 84

5.4 Two-Phase Electrolysis 85

5.5 Electrode Materials 87

5.6 Towards Pharmaceutical Products 88

5.7 Future Prospects 90

References 91

6 Electrochemical Engineering and Cell Design 95
Frank C. Walsh and Derek Pletcher

6.1 Principles of Electrochemical Reactor Design 96

6.1.1 Cell Potential 96

6.1.2 The Rate of Chemical Change 97

6.2 Decisions During the Process of Cell Design 98

6.2.1 Strategic Decisions 98

6.2.2 Divided and Undivided Cells 98

6.2.3 Monopolar and Bipolar Electrical Connections to Electrodes 99

6.2.4 Scaling the Cell Current 100

6.2.5 Porous 3D Electrode Structures 100

6.2.6 Interelectrode Gap 101

6.3 The Influence of Electrochemical Engineering on the Chlor-Alkali Industry 102

6.4 Parallel Plate Cells 105

6.5 Redox Flow Batteries 106

6.6 Rotating Cylinder Electrode Cells 107

6.7 Conclusions 108

References 109

7 Electrochemical Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (EC-SERS): Early History, Principles, Methods, and Experiments 113
Zhong-Qun Tian and Xue-Min Zhang

7.1 Early History of Electrochemical Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy 116

7.2 Principles and Methods of SERS 117

7.2.1 Electromagnetic Enhancement of SERS 118

7.2.2 Key Factors Influencing SERS 119

7.2.3 “Borrowing SERS Activity” Methods 121

7.2.4 Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy 123

7.3 Features of EC-SERS 124

7.3.1 Electrochemical Double Layer of EC-SERS Systems 124

7.3.2 Electrolyte Solutions and Solvent Dependency 125

7.4 EC-SERS Experiments 125

7.4.1 Measurement Procedures for EC-SERS 125

7.4.2 Experimental Set-Up for EC-SERS 127

7.4.3 Preparation of SERS Substrates 128

Acknowledgments 131

References 131

8 Applications of Electrochemical Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (EC-SERS) 137
Marco Musiani, Jun-Yang Liu and Zhong-Qun Tian

8.1 Pyridine Adsorption on Different Metal Surfaces 138

8.2 Interfacial Water on Different Metals 141

8.3 Coadsorption of Thiourea with Inorganic Anions 143

8.4 Electroplating Additives 146

8.5 Inhibition of Copper Corrosion 147

8.6 Extension of SERS to the Corrosion of Fe and Its Alloys: Passivity 149

8.6.1 Fe-on-Ag 150

8.6.2 Ag-on-Fe 150

8.7 SERS of Corrosion Inhibitors on Bare Transition Metal Electrodes 150

8.8 Lithium Batteries 152

8.9 Intermediates of Electrocatalysis 154

Acknowledgments 156

References 156

9 In-Situ Scanning Probe Microscopies: Imaging and Beyond 163
Bing-Wei Mao

9.1 Principle of In-Situ STM and In-Situ AFM 164

9.1.1 Principle of In-Situ STM 164

9.1.2 Principle of In-Situ AFM 166

9.2 In-Situ STM Characterization of Surface Electrochemical Processes 167

9.2.1 In-Situ STM Study of Electrode–Aqueous Solution Interfaces 167

9.2.2 In-Situ STM Study of Electrode–Ionic Liquid Interface 167

9.3 In-Situ AFM Probing of Electric Double Layer 170

9.4 Electrochemical STM Break-Junction for Surface Nanostructuring and Nanoelectronics and Molecular Electronics 173

9.5 Outlook 176

References 177

10 In-Situ Infrared Spectroelectrochemical Studies of the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction 183
Richard J. Nichols

10.1 The H+/H2 Couple 183

10.2 Single-Crystal Surfaces 184

10.3 Subtractively Normalized Interfacial Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy 186

10.4 Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy 189

10.5 Surface-Enhanced IR Absorption Spectroscopy 190

10.6 In-Situ Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy 193

10.7 Spectroscopy at Single-Crystal Surfaces 194

10.8 Overall Conclusions 197

References 198

11 Electrochemical Noise: A Powerful General Tool 201
Claude Gabrielli and David E. Williams

11.1 Instrumentation 202

11.2 Applications 204

11.2.1 Elementary Phenomena 204

11.2.2 Bioelectrochemistry 205

11.2.3 Electrocrystallization 207

11.2.4 Corrosion 209

11.2.5 Other Systems 215

11.3 Conclusions 217

References 217

12 From Microelectrodes to Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy 223
Salvatore Daniele and Guy Denuault

12.1 The Contribution of Microelectrodes to Electroanalytical Chemistry 224

12.1.1 Advantages of Microelectrodes in Electroanalysis 224

12.1.2 Microelectrodes and Electrode Materials 226

12.1.3 New Applications of Microelectrodes in Electroanalysis 227

12.2 Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) 230

12.2.1 A Brief History of SECM 230

12.2.2 SECM with Other Techniques 231

12.2.3 Tip Geometries and the Need for Numerical Modeling 233

12.2.4 Applications of SECM 234

12.3 Conclusions 235

References 235

13 Cold Fusion After A Quarter-Century: The Pd/D System 245
Melvin H. Miles and Michael C.H. McKubre

13.1 The Reproducibility Issue 247

13.2 Palladium–Deuterium Loading 247

13.3 Electrochemical Calorimetry 249

13.4 Isoperibolic Calorimetric Equations and Modeling 250

13.5 Calorimetric Approximations 251

13.6 Numerical Integration of Calorimetric Data 252

13.7 Examples of Fleischmann’s Calorimetric Applications 254

13.8 Reported Reaction Products for the Pd/D System 256

13.8.1 Helium-4 256

13.8.2 Tritium 256

13.8.3 Neutrons, X-Rays, and Transmutations 257

13.9 Present Status of Cold Fusion 257

Acknowledgments 258

References 258

14 In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction of Electrode Surface Structure 261
Andrea E. Russell, Stephen W.T. Price and Stephen J. Thompson

14.1 Early Work 262

14.2 Synchrotron-Based In-Situ XRD 264

14.3 Studies Inspired by Martin Fleischmann’s Work 266

14.3.1 Structure of Water at the Interface 266

14.3.2 Adsorption of Ions 268

14.3.3 Oxide/Hydroxide Formation 268

14.3.4 Underpotential Deposition (upd) of Monolayers 270

14.3.5 Reconstructions of Single-Crystal Surfaces 275

14.3.6 High-Surface-Area Electrode Structures 275

14.4 Conclusions 277

References 277

15 Tribocorrosion 281
Robert J.K. Wood

15.1 Introduction and Definitions 281

15.1.1 Tribocorrosion 282

15.1.2 Erosion 282

15.2 Particle–Surface Interactions 283

15.3 Depassivation and Repassivation Kinetics 283

15.3.1 Depassivation 284

15.3.2 Repassivation Rate 286

15.4 Models and Mapping 287

15.5 Electrochemical Monitoring of Erosion–Corrosion 290

15.6 Tribocorrosion within the Body: Metal-on-Metal Hip Joints 291

15.7 Conclusions 293

Acknowledgments 293

References 293

16 Hard Science at Soft Interfaces 295
Hubert H. Girault

16.1 Charge Transfer Reactions at Soft Interfaces 295

16.1.1 Ion Transfer Reactions 296

16.1.2 Assisted Ion Transfer Reactions 298

16.1.3 Electron Transfer Reactions 299

16.2 Electrocatalysis at Soft Interfaces 300

16.2.1 Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) 301

16.2.2 Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) 302

16.3 Micro- and Nano-Soft Interfaces 304

16.4 Plasmonics at Soft Interfaces 305

16.5 Conclusions and Future Developments 305

References 307

17 Electrochemistry in Unusual Fluids 309
Philip N. Bartlett

17.1 Electrochemistry in Plasmas 310

17.2 Electrochemistry in Supercritical Fluids 314

17.2.1 Applications of SCF Electrochemistry 321

17.3 Conclusions 325

Acknowledgments 325

References 325

18 Aspects of Light-Driven Water Splitting 331
Laurence Peter

18.1 A Very Brief History of Semiconductor Electrochemistry 332

18.2 Thermodynamic and Kinetic Criteria for Light-Driven Water Splitting 334

18.3 Kinetics of Minority Carrier Reactions at Semiconductor Electrodes 336

18.4 The Importance of Electron–Hole Recombination 338

18.5 Fermi Level Splitting in the Semiconductor–Electrolyte Junction 339

18.6 A Simple Model for Light-Driven Water-Splitting Reaction 341

18.7 Evidence for Slow Electron Transfer During Light-Driven Water Splitting 343

18.8 Conclusions 345

Acknowledgments 345

References 346

19 Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy 349
Samin Sharifi-Asl and Digby D. Macdonald

19.1 Theory 350

19.2 The Point Defect Model 350

19.2.1 Calculation of Y0F 355

19.2.2 Calculation of ΔC0 i ΔU 355

19.2.3 Calculation of ΔCL v ΔU 356

19.3 The Passivation of Copper in Sulfide-Containing Brine 357

19.4 Summary and Conclusions 363

Acknowledgments 363

References 363

Index 367