Dr. Brian Ahern Connects Nanomagnetism & LENR — Interview

Dr. Ahern is a physicist with a PhD from MIT whose academic work focused on exploring BCS-theory and superconductivity. In 2012, he issued an in-depth report on nano-scale cold fusion for the Electric Power Research Institute. Earlier this year the open-source Martin Fleischman Memorial Project added Brian to their global-coalition of researchers and experimentalists who are working to bring an open-source cold fusion solution to the world. He was also a featured lecturer at this year’s 2014 MIT LENR Colloquium – an annual event hosted by Drs. Mitchell Schwarz & Peter Hagelstein. His presentation focused on the relationship between excess heat and nano-magnetism. An outline of our dialogue can be referenced below:

0.min-10.min: Brian’s thesis on high-temperature superconductors; Brian’s interest in LENR; Keith Johnson; technical problems inherent to high-temperature superconductors; distorted electron orbitals and cooperative oscillatory modes; Stanislaw Ulam’s model of non-linear anharmonic oscillators

10.min-20.min: Energy localization; Arata and nano-particles; new energetics at nano-scale; nano-particles and anharmonic collective modes; collective vortex-like orbital effects; super-ferromagnetism at nano-scale; Don Hotson and the Dirac Sea; magnetic vortices as negative-energy transducers/transformers

20.min-30.min: Self-organization; spintronics; anharmonic modes on all scales; chaos theory; vibration and chemical bonding in living systems; order out of chaos at 5-10 nano-meter scale; incredible enzyme efficiency; pulsing and increased power output; Arthur Manelas’ free energy vacuum battery; validating over-unity; replicating Floyd Sweet; cold transformer indicative of new physics

30.min-42.min: Pulsing nano-systems; providing Martin Fleischman Memorial Project with engineered nano-particles; 2014 MIT LENR Colloquium; Mizuno’s new experiment; fractalizing nano-particle surface with pulsed glow discharge; Mizuno’s history with LENR; applying energetic self-organizing collective modes to various electromagnetic systems; the mysteries of magnetism; new ELFORSK report on and tests of Rossi’s E-Cat; the reality of LENR and repeatability

For past interviews and articles please visit Q-Niverse and/or Blue Science at your leisure. Thanks for your support.

Dr. Edmund Storms Explains LENR — New Interview

A brief description of our dialogue titled Nano-Cracks, Metallic Hydrogen, & Explaining LENR:

Dr. Storms is a nuclear chemist who spent thirty-four years working at Los Alamos National Labs. There he conducted research into materials for use in nuclear power and propulsion reactors, including studies of cold fusion. Ed is also the author of The Science of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction, published in 2007, and has recently published a follow-up book – The Explanation of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction – exploring the theoretical side of LENR. His book can be found at Infinite-Energy.com

Hope you enjoy. Check out my blog Q-Niverse and Blue-Science.org for more of my content. Thanks again.

Gregory Chaitin on cold fusion research: Japan and Sweden are the “only two countries with the political will”

Gregory Chaitin is a Professor of Computer Science and Philosophy of Computing at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Here he discusses the landscape of LENR with Tom O’Brien posting on podomatic. Chaitin gives Andrea Rossi credit for bringing cold fusion to a wider consciousness and mentions Mats Lewan‘s new book An Impossible Invention, which he finds to be an excellent look at the unveiling of the E-Cat.

Go to Tom O’Brien‘s interview with Gregory Chaitin on Podomatic here.

He also touches on the 2014 CF/LANR Colloquium at MIT held on the 25th Anniversary of the announcement of cold fusion, a bit of the science and politics behind LENR, the current lack of an accepted theory, and Japanese and Swedish research.

Chaitin is particularly impressed with Clean Planet, Inc., and newly formed group dedicated to bringing LENR technology forward through funding and support. Listen to Clean Planet’s Hideki Yoshino present some of this research work [.pdf][.mp3] performed by Tadahiko Mizuno and his team at the recent Colloquium at MIT, or watch the video here.

Related Links

Mats Lewan Interview: E-Cat, Andrea Rossi, and An Impossible Invention

2014 CF/LANR Colloquium at MIT presentation archive

Industry and academic partnerships report from JCF-14 meeting

Rossi E-Cat energy “off the chart”

Revolution-Green’s Mark Dansie On Transition Technology & LENR

Interview with Revolution-Green’s Mark Dansie. Mark is recognized as a world-renowned evaluator of energy technologies and is currently helping develop several new energy concepts himself. Over the last seven years, Mark has traveled the world evaluating many new and free technology claims. He specializes in magnetic motor and HHO gas evaluations, but has reviewed many other technologies as well. He has been featured as a speaker at several energy conferences, and his catch cry is “show me the data” as he is a believer in scientific methodology when evaluating claims. More information can be found at http://revolution-green.com/.

We discuss various topics including “free” energy, stepping-stone technologies such as thorium-power, as well as what Mark expects from Cold Fusion-LENR in both the immediate future and the long-term.

If so desired a downloadable MP3 version can be found here, and on iTunes. Thanks for taking an interest.

2014 CF/LANR Colloquium at MIT audio files

The water in one cup of coffee could make a cold fusion battery that would last 18 years.
Dr. Mitchell Swartz at the 2014 CF/LANR Colloquium

The 2014 LANR/CF Colloquium brought international scientists to the MIT campus March 21-23, 2014 to share the most up-to-date and innovative research on cold fusion, also called lattice-assisted nuclear reactions (LANR). It was the sixth such event organized by Mitchell Swartz and Gayle Verner of JET Energy, and the atmosphere was electric as one speaker after another reported on research with world-changing implications.

The intimate gathering began in one room, but then had to move to another room as the audience grew within the first hour. Investors, entrepreneurs, and a few more students rounded out the scientists in attendance.


Find 2014 CF/LANR Colloquium at MIT updated Audio, Video and Full Coverage Here


Jeremy Rys captured video that will be available on the Cold Fusion Now Youtube channel as they are edited. I took photos and recorded audio. As usual, the mainstream press was absent, and I am unaware of any reporters at all showing up to cover the event.

frisbee-in-classBut Cold Fusion Now represented with complimentary calendars and Infinite Energy provided free magazines. Colloquium organizers made frisbees! – here displayed on the wall of my Prealgebra classroom at 8AM the following morning.

This was one fun event, and the whole crowd was buzzing with positivity. Two days later, I still feel charged-up about the accelerated pace of discovery, and interest in the field. It’s been a difficult couple of decades for breakthrough energy researchers, but on this 25th Anniversary of the Announcement of Cold Fusion, there’s a real feeling of hope that glues everybody together and strengthens the commitment and dedication to find a solution to our energy problems.

Even as environmental disasters mount, listen to these lectures, and you might feel it too! The science results are tremendous, and show a path to a peaceful, green, technological future for all of Earth.

Thus it is, Francesco Celani reported that the Martin Fleischmann Memorial Project was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize!


Find 2014 CF/LANR Colloquium at MIT updated Audio, Video and Full Coverage Here


Related Links

Past Colloquium
2011: Part 1 – http://www.infinite-energy.com/images/pdfs/LANR2011Colloq.pdf
Part 2 – http://www.infinite-energy.com/images/pdfs/SwartzColloqPart2.pdf
2010: http://www.infinite-energy.com/images/pdfs/Colloquium2010.pdf
2009: http://world.std.com/~mica/colloq09.html
2007: http://www.infinite-energy.com/iemagazine/issue75/colloquium.html
2005: http://world.std.com/~mica/colloq.html