Yasuhiro Iwamura on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast

Dr. Yasuhiro Iwamura is the guest on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast with Ruby Carat. Dr. Iwamura is a Research Professor in the Condensed Matter Nuclear Science division at the Research Center for Electron

Photon Science at Tohoku University. He has been dividing his time there between engineering a second Metal Hydrogen Energy generator with Clean Planet Inc. , as well as continuing his signature transmutation work with Mitsubishi.

Listen to Yasuhiro Iwamura on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast with Ruby Carat here on our Podcast page.

After graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1990 with a degree in Nuclear Engineering, he received a research scientist position with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. “After graduate school, I entered fundamental research laboratory of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. At that time, Japan had a good economy, and fundamental research was very active,” says Dr. Iwamura.

“I had been interested in cold fusion and seeking a chance to propose a research theme related to cold fusion. Fortunately, ICCF-3 was held at Nagoya in Japan in October 1992, and I attended it. I talked with many researchers at the conference and I was convinced that cold fusion was real. So I proposed a research plan to my laboratory and it was approved.”

“At the beginning of my research, we mainly did gas-loading and electrolysis type experiments, and finally we reached the permeation in this transmutation method.”

Nuclear transmutation work is replicated

The nuclear transmutations method developed by Dr. Iwamura and his team at Mitsubishi uses a host material described as a “nano-structured thin-film composed of palladium and calcium oxide and palladium substrate, with a target element” then planted between the layers.

A typical target element of Cesium is then transmuted to Praseodymium. Barium has been transmuted into samarium and tungsten into platinum.

Dr. Iwamura cannot explain the mechanism of the reaction behind these results, but he does reveal an experimental fact that should give theorists a clue in trying to construct a model of the reaction.

“We observe 2 or 4 or 6 deuterons make fusion for the target materials. The exact mechanism for the transmutation is not clear, of course, but I speculate that two deuterons are related to helium.”

“A helium atom consists of two protons and two neutrons, and two deuterons consists of two protons and two neutrons. So I suspect that this kind of mechanism exists in this type of transmutation reaction.”

Dr. Iwamura believes that a “very small amount of foreign element like impurity plays a very important role to induce condensed matter nuclear reactions”, too.

In the podcast, he gives an example. “In the case of our type of transmutation reactions, if we put calcium oxide onto the palladium thin-film, near the surface area, transmutation reactions occur, but if we use palladium only, we cannot observe a transmutation reaction.”

“It’s just a speculation, but I speculate that the interface between the foreign element, like calcium oxide, and the main element like the palladium, at the near surface plays a very important role. The mechanism is not so clear, but I suspect this kind of mechanics is behind condensed matter nuclear reactions.”

Transmutation work provides method for radioactive waste cleanup

Yasuhiro Iwamura continues the Mitsubishi transmutation work at Tohoku with support from both Mitsubishi and Clean Planet, Inc. Clean Planet CEO Hideki Yoshino has organized several collaborative efforts with academia and industry in Japan with the hopes of engineering an ultra-clean energy technology, and, ridding the globe of the tons radioactive waste by transmuting it to benign materials.

Dr. Iwamura says, “So even though I’ve moved to Tohoku University from Mitsubishi Heavy industries, I continue to make transmutation experiments using radioactive isotope Cesium-133 at Tohoku University.”

“If this type of transmutation reaction can be applied to radioactive isotopes, it will be possible to get rid of the radioactivity of nuclear waste. The transmutation of a radioactive element is beneficial to society, because many nuclear reactors are working all over the world and generate toxic radioactive waste, and getting rid of toxic radioactivity from Fukushima area in Japan is also beneficial to our society.”

This transmutation work was replicated by other institutes such as Toyota R&D, and is still in its early research stages, but the effort, along with the MHE excess heat project, will benefit greatly from the recent shares of Clean Planet bought by the Mitsubishi Estate Company.

“The stronger financial base of Clean Planet is beneficial to my Tohoku team and to make wider choices towards commercialization”, says Iwamura. “So of course it’s very good, and we’re very grateful to the Mitsubishi Estate companies.”

Of course the commercialization effort includes MHE generator, too.

MHE energy profiles replicated with same samples

“My colleague Ito and I did not have much experience with excess heat experiments before we moved to Tohoku University, because our work at Mitsubishi Heavy Industry was only transmutations. So it was a good chance to learn excess heat generation experiments using the MHE apparatus funded by the Japanese government organization NEDO, the New Energy Development Organization.”

The original MHE generator is located at Kobe University, and is the work of Dr. Akito Takahashi, Dr. Akira Kitamura, as well as a team of scientists and graduate students.


Read our interview with Dr. Akito Takahashi on the Cold Fusion Now! blog here.


A second Metal Hydrogen Energy device at Tohoku Univeristy designed to replicate results of the first MHE generator located at Kobe University. Graphic: Yasuhiro Iwamura ICCF21 presentation file

“The objective of our collaborative research is to clarify the existence of the anomalous heat generative phenomenon and to confirm reproducibility of the phenomenon. For the purpose, we did not change the design of the experimental apparatus intentionally. So, the second Metal Hydrogen Energy device located at Tohoku University is nearly equal to the first apparatus at Kobe University.”

“Of course we have some different points, for example our experimental apparatus is equipped with a larger number of measurement points, and some couples in our apparatus are slightly different to the first one, but basically, we did not change the design of the experimental apparatus intentionally to show the reproducibility of this phenomenon.”

Dr. Iwamura presented the latest second MHE generator results at ICCF-21 conference reporting excess heat results that were replicated by other labs using the same samples.


Watch Dr. Yasuhiro Iwamura’s presentation at ICCF-21 here on the ICCF-21 Youtube channel. Follow the link to download the presentation file in .pdf.


“Anomalous excess heat generations were observed for all the active samples at elevated temperature, about 150C-350C degrees Centigrade, and the amount of anomalous heat generation per hydrogen atom ranges from 10 eV per hydrogen to 100 eV per hydrogen or deuterium, which could not be explained by any known chemical process.”

Excess heat results for one sample run on the second MHE generator. Graphic: Yasuhiro Iwamura ICCF21 presentation file.

Also, there were “coincident burst-like increased pressure -and gas temperature- events of the reaction chamber, which suggested sudden energy release in the reaction chamber.”

“These results were observed for all experiments using the copper-nickel-zirconium material with H2 gas. Also, very large local bursts of energy release were obtained as evidenced by the broken zirconia beads used as a medium for the nano-particles.”

“Excess heat experiments using the same material at Kobe and Tohoku Universities showed similar experimental results, and the qualitative reproducibility between Kobe and Tohoku was very good.”

Close communication is key to successful replication

The success of the Japanese LENR research program is unmatched by any other country on the globe, and while support for LENR is not universal within governmental organizations, the continued positive gains provided by the researchers there has made it easier for mainstream organizations to lend a helping hand in a country with big energy needs.

In the cross-disciplinary field of condensed matter nuclear science, collaborative research requires the coordination of scientists from different fields, and Dr. Iwamura feels that “good and frequent communication between Japanese groups is the key” to successful replications.

“For example, I know Professor Takahashi and Professor Kitamura very well, and I ask them frequently about experimental device and method in detail. And during the NEDO project, our research groups often held meetings, and exchanged detailed information. So communication is the key, I think.”


Listen to Yasuhiro Iwamura on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast with Ruby Carat here on our Podcast page.


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The Cold Fusion Now! Collective will be attending the LANR/CF Colloquium on the 30th Anniversary of the announcement of cold fusion! We’ll be collecting video for our documentary on the field – hope to see you there

2019 LANR/CF Colloquium at MIT honors 30-years of breakthrough science

CMNS investigators and the science community will be celebrating the 30th-anniversary of the announcement of cold fusion at the LANR/CF Colloquium at MIT on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA on Saturday, March 23 and Sunday, March 24, 2019.

These colloquiua have been hosted for many years by Dr. Mitchell Swartz of  JET Energy Incorporated, Dr. Peter Hagelstein of the Energy Production and Energy Conversion Group at MIT, and Gayle Verner, also of JET Energy.

The focus is the science and engineering of successful Lattice Assisted Nuclear Reaction [LANR] systems, including the important roles of the lattice and material science issues, as well as electrophysics.

Dr. Swartz believes engineering, along with the benefits of teaching its principles, is vital for success of attaining active LANR systems.

He has previously demonstrated the importance of this with his engineered systems including his metamaterial high impedance aqueous PHUSOR®-type technology that was shown on the MIT campus in 2003 as part of  ICCF10, and, his dry preloaded NANOR®-type component technology demonstrated in 2012 at the Cold Fusion 101 IAP Course at MIT, which ran for 3 months thereafter.

“Where is there science without engineering?” he asks.

“When we first made ‘cat whiskers’ back in the 50s using galena (a mineral) and a perpendicular wire positioned on it to make a junction “diode” – that was considered high-tech.  Now look how far we’ve come with the engineering in that technology.” 

“Similarly,” says Dr. Swartz, “in this clean energy-production field, there is much data heralding that applied engineering has also improved results: including incremental power gain, total output power, and excess energy density which have all increased; supplemented by improving controls and many new diagnostics.”

“Research takes meticulous effort, taking the time to write it up, and if you’re lucky – submitting it and getting feedback. So that’s why we’re having a posters at the colloquium.”

Updates will be posted here and 2019 LANR/CF Colloquium website at:   http://theworld.com/~mica/2019colloq.html

Attendance to the Meeting requires pre-Registration. The room size for the Colloquium is space-limited, and due to this limited size, there will be no walk-ins.

Note that the DEADLINE for REGISTRATION is March 14th.

See accommodations options 2019 LANR/CF Hotel Options [.pdf]

See closest hotels to campus on google maps.

AGENDA and Tentative Schedule
LANR Science and Engineering: From Hydrogen to Clean Energy Production Systems

SATURDAY
I. Experimental Confirmations of LANR/CF
A, Energy Production:
Excess Heat/Tardive Thermal Power (Heat after Death)
Helium Production/Other Products
Penetrating Emissions/Particles
Distinguishing Optical/Radiofrequency/Acoustic Signatures
Engineering Methods of Activation/Control
Engineering of Applied Magnetic Field Intensities

B. Energy Conversion:
Stirling LANR Engines/Propulsion Systems
Thermoelectric Conversion/Direct LANR Electrical Generation
Rotating Linked LANR Magnetic Systems
Acoustic LANR Conversion Systems

II. Other Experimental Support for LANR/CF
Supporting Confirmations (eg Fract. And Comb Phonon Expts)

III. Theories Supporting/Consistent with LANR/CF
Lattice/Metallurgical/Material Science
Nuclear
Electromagnetic
Other

IV. Engineering Applications from/of LANR/CF

V. Reconciliation of Success with Policy/Obstruction


See the previous 2014 LANR/CF Colloquium lectures here, held on the 25th Anniversary of the announcement of cold fusion.


Andrea Rossi EcatSK demo

“The EcatSK is available now for industrial applications. If you want safe, reliable, competitively priced heat, we encourage you to contact us.”

That was the announcement on the EcatSK demonstration broadcast live on the Network at http://www.ecatskdemo.com/ January 31, in an event dedicated to Swedish scientist Dr. Sven Kullander.

From the Press Release:

“The E-Cat SK produces kilowatts of energy while consuming only grams of inexpensive and abundant fuel (hydrogen, nickel, lithium) over a period of six months.”

A screenshot from EcatSKdemo.com shows:

Watch a video of the demo here on Youtube.

But videos don’t translate into the real, physical world, yet.

LENR bad-boy Andrea Rossi, inventor of the EcatSK, draws ire from working scientists in the CMNS field for his theatrics and demonstrations that have yet to be confirmed by the community-at-large. He does not attend conferences or meetings, does not publish in JCMNS, and has little contact with active CMNS researchers. Documents from the very public trial with former partner Industrial Heat showed a decidedly uncooperative Leonardo Corporation working outside the bounds of normal business expectation.

Listen to the Cold Fusion Now! podcast episodes with Abd ul-Rahmann Lomax, who documented the trial, and Mats Lewan, who authored An Impossible Invention, a book that follows the development of Andrea Rossi’s Ecat.

But if LENR had a Human Resources center, they would be hard-pressed to find anything that resembled a mainstream scientific organization. The people who would tread into the pariah science of cold fusion, conduct advanced nuclear research in basement labs at their own expense, banned from publishing any corroborated results, and derided by their peers adorned with money and fame – are by self-selection uniquely fashioned individuals, and that quality intensifies at the fringes of the fringe.

Andrea Rossi escaped the US with $10 million and moved his enterprise to Sweden, where the QuarkX and new EcatSK have been developed. The EcatSK reactive material based on nickel and light-hydrogen has had a long history of making big heat.

Precedence for excess heat from nickel-hydrogen systems

In August of 1989, University of Siena Professor of Physics Francesco Piantelli discovered the anomalous heat effect in Nickel-Hydrogen systems, and made exceptionally large output power in the process. His collaborations with Professors Sergio Focardi and Robert Habel began in 1990.

Mathieu Valat of MFMP (L) and Francesco Piantelli (R).

Seventeen years later, Andrea Rossi asked Dr. Focardi to evaluate his then-Energy Catalyzer, and got a positive review. The relationship continued through Sergio Focardi’s death in 2013.

Sergio Focardi portrait after October 6, 2011 demonstration of E-Cat.

Dismissed as a con man taking advantage of an elderly scientist, we believe this early LENR pioneer deserves more credit. Cold Fusion Now! accepts that Andrea Rossi can make a reaction happen, but has problems controlling the reaction to make a technology, just like everybody else in this field.

Mats Lewan, author of An Impossible Invention, a book on the development of the Ecat, writes on his blog, that the new device “uses only minute amounts of abundant elements such as hydrogen, nickel, lithium and aluminium”.

Has this fuel changed from previous mixtures?

Nickel is a catalyst for the fuel

In Analysis of New Rossi PCT filing based on US Patent 9,115,913 issued 25Aug15 patent lawyer David French writes:

Among the embodiments are those in which the fuel mixture includes lithium and lithium aluminum hydride, those in which the catalyst includes a group 10 element, such as nickel in powdered form, or in any combination thereof.

In other embodiments, the catalyst in powdered form, has been treated to enhance its porosity. For example, the catalyst can be nickel powder that has been treated to enhance porosity thereof. [In those embodiments that include an electrical resistor, the].The apparatus can also include an electrical energy source, such as a voltage source and/or current source in electrical communication with the [resistor.] heat source.

Among the other embodiments are those in which the fuel wafer includes a multi-layer structure having a layer of the fuel mixture in thermal communication with a layer containing the electrical resistor. heat source.

In yet other embodiments, the fuel wafer includes a central heating insert and a pair of fuel inserts disposed on either side of the heating insert.

Read full article Analysis of New Rossi PCT filing based on US Patent 9,115,913 issued 25Aug15 by David French for more on brackets.

Furthermore,

The powder in the fuel mixture consists largely of spherical particles having diameters in the nanometer to micrometer range, for example between 1 nanometer and 100 micrometers. Variations in the ratio of reactants and catalyst tend to govern reaction rate and are not critical. However, it has been found that a suitable mixture would include a starting mixture of 50% nickel, 20% lithium, and 30% LAH. Within this mixture, nickel acts as a catalyst for the reaction, and is not itself a reagent. While nickel is particularly useful because of its relative abundance, its function can also be carried out by other elements in column 10 of the periodic table, such as platinum or palladium.

Reproductions of the Rossi Ecat have been conducted world-wide, with mixed results. The successful fuel recipe with the combinations and concentrations of critical elements is still unknown.

“Any element that reacts with hydrogen appears to support LENR – titanium, nickel, zirconium have all been explored. The big challenge is to find out what it is about those hydrides that is unique and makes it possible to initiate a nuclear reaction.” says Dr. Edmund Storms, a nuclear chemist and LENR researcher. “Rossi found that nickel is important, but there’s a certain lack of understanding of what Rossi did.”

“Rossi identified nickel as being where the nuclear reaction was occurring. But that is actually not the material he was using initially; he was using a nickel catalyst. A nickel catalyst is not pure nickel. It’s nickel that has been applied to some inert substrate. That’s the way catalysts work.”

Edmund Storms spoke with Ruby on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast and gave a tutorial on catalysts.

“There’s an acting metal that can break the hydrogen bond, and then, there’s an inert substrate on which the hydrogen atom can diffuse, causing what’s called spillover hydrogen. It’s that spillover hydrogen that is active for the reaction, not the hydrogen in the nickel. So there’s reason to think the nickel is not where the action is.”

Historical example of catalytic fusion

An example is found in the work of Les Case, a chemical engineer with four degrees from MIT who discovered what he called catalytic fusion using palladium and deuterium systems. Case found that a catalyst made by depositing palladium – in finely divided form – on charcoal, could be made nuclear active.

Graphic: Les Case in 1998 from http://www.angelfire.com/scifi2/zpt/case.html

Ten years ago, Case wrote, “I discovered that using certain standard commercial catalysts, one could get this fusion to occur under reproducible, mild conditions. This is the catalyst that I’ve set upon as being about the most effective that I currently have available. This is a standard palladium on activated carbon catalyst. One-half percent by weight of palladium loaded on this activated carbon— this is the key. You change this just a little bit and it doesn’t work— at all! But if you stay within the approved ranges, it works basically all the time.” -Infinite Energy Magazine July 1999

This was the experiment eventually reproduced by a team at SRI International led by Dr. Michael McKubre that also correlated the excess heat with the nuclear product Helium-4.

“Now, people said, ok the reaction is happening on the finely divided palladium,” continues Storms. “but that’s not necessarily true. The reaction could also be happening in the charcoal.”

“The charcoal cracks a lot. Look at it on a scanning electron microscope and you can see the cracks. All the charcoal has to do is allow the hydrogen atoms being generated at the palladium to diffuse across the surface to find a crack where the nuclear reaction occurs.”

This hypothesis is supported by the fact that when the source of charcoal, made from a particular coconut collected from a South Pacific island, was no longer available, Case could not get the reaction to work ever again; no other charcoal would work in his device.

“We have to be very careful in imagining where this nuclear reaction actually occurs. Even in palladium, in the electrolytic experiments, it only occurs very near the surface. And the surface of the cathode is not pure palladium, it’s a very complex alloy, and it’s also complex metalgraphically, so there’s a lot of stuff going on there, that has no relationship whatsoever to how people imagine palladium to look.”

According to Edmund Storms, there is no reason to believe that the nuclear reaction was occurring in the palladium itself, and likewise, the same situation would apply to the nickel-hydrogen reactions.

If Andrea Rossi has found the right mix of elements to catalyze and control the reaction, only time will tell as we wait for confirmation.

Robert Godes on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast

Robert Godes, the President and Chief Technical Officer of Brillouin Energy, is the guest on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast and discusses the latest changes to their signature LENR reactor now in development as a commercial product, the Brillouin Hydrogen Hot Tube.

Listen to Robert Godes, Brillouin Energy on the Cold Fusion Now! Podcast page

Last June 2018 at ICCF-21, Dr. Francis Tanzella of SRI International reported on a year-long test of over thirty Brillouin HHT reactor cores with thermal power outputs of about 1.5x the initial electrical input, and producing under 10 Watts excess.

Watch video of Dr. Francis Tanzella’s ICCF-21 presentation Nanosecond Pulse Stimulation in the Ni-H2 System here.

Download the ICCF-21 presentation file here.

On-and-off control of the reaction has been routine for the Brillouin lab since its inception; they use a proprietary “Q-pulse” electrical stimulation to initiate and regulate the excess thermal power. But swapping out reactor cores and producing the same excess power results demonstrated that the year-long focus on quality materials manufacturing paid off.

Go to the Brillouin Energy website http://brillouinenergy.com/ to download the technical reports issued by SRI International.

By December 2018, a newly-designed Q-pulse board raised the thermal output to about 50 Watts reliable excess heat, all generated by a 2x COP.

“The highest power run then was 53 watts in and 109 Watts out,” wrote Godes. “A typical run looks like this”:

But just since this podcast was recorded, the HHT thermal power output has surged, more than doubling its December values and jumping to 100+ Watts – with more than 2x power output.

In the interview with Ruby, Robert Godes explains the Hydrogen Hot Tube marketing plans. Brillouin Energy Corp. has negotiated and sold licensing rights to several companies along the Pacific rim and there are negotiations with a mid-Eastern company for regional manufacturing rights.

All this may seem pre-mature; there are still engineering challenges ahead. However, with the LENR field advancing quickly, companies are accepting the risk and making the research investment now, fearing the higher costs after breakthrough.

The next phase of Hot Tube development is also open to a select public. One billion “Brillouin units” will available for purchase at a new company website http://bec.ltd/

From the website:

There is an opportunity for up to 299 US investors and up to 1,700 non-US investors to participate in this fund. Access to the fund will be on a first come, first served basis, beginning soon.

The minimum investment in this fund is 24,750 EUR. Register here to get on the waitlist and receive advanced notice when the units in the fund become for sale.

With the fund’s proceeds, BEC Ltd. will purchase from Brillouin Energy Corp. a dedicated class of preferred stock established in its charter, with the following terms.

Brillouin Energy Corp. will distribute 20% of its net profit to BEC Ltd. until the total distributed profit reaches five times the initial fund value, after which

Brillouin Energy Corp. will distribute 10% of its net profit to BEC Ltd. until the total distributed profit reaches ten times the initial fund value, after which

Brillouin Energy Corp. will distribute 5% of its net profit to BEC Ltd. in perpetuity

BEC Ltd. will distribute all revenues received from Brillouin Energy Corp. to unit holders equally on a per unit basis.

“I’m determined to bring the Hot Tube to market,” says Robert Godes. “We’ve got original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) that can design our reactor into highly energy-efficient products and de-carbonize this planet.”

The amount of hydrogen in an average glass of water contains enough energy density, when applied to Brillouin Energy’s unique boiler systems, to power 30,000 homes for a year.

Listen to Brillouin Energy’s President and Chief Technical Officer Robert Godes discuss, science, technology, and LENR theory on the twentieth episode Cold Fusion Now! podcast with Ruby Carat on our podcast page, or, subscribe in iTunes.


Cold Fusion Now! brings the voices of breakthrough energy scientists to the public and we need your financial support to continue. Go to our website at coldfusionnow.org/sponsors/ to be a Cold Fusion Now! SuSteamer or sign-up on Patreon.

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Edmund Storms on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast

Nuclear chemist and former Los Alamos National Laboratory rocket scientist Dr. Edmund Storms has been researching cold fusion/LENR since 1989 and talks with Ruby Carat on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast about this new area of science founded by Drs. Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons.

Edmund Storms is widely considered one of the foremost researchers in the cold fusion field. In 1989, he and Carol Talcott detected tritium from Fleischmann-Pons cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In May 1993, he was invited to testify before a congressional committee about the cold fusion effect. In 1998, Wired magazine honored him, along with Michael McKubre, as one of the 25 people in the U.S. who is making a significant contribution to new ideas.

Read Wired Magazine November 1, 1998 The Wired 25 and
“What is Cold Fusion is Real?”.

The Science of Low Energy Nuclear ReactionsEdmund Storms has written over a hundred papers and several surveys of the condensed matter nuclear science field, including books The Science of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction, a survey of the experiments and theories of the field through 2007, and, The Explanation of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction, A Comprehensive Compilation of Evidence and Explanations about Cold Fusion, describing the top contenders for a LENR theory, as well as providing a new model of the reaction derived solely from the physical evidence.

Edmund Storms’ website http://lenrexplained.com/ describes this work.

A LENR Research Documentation Project by Thomas Grimshaw of the Energy Institute University of Texas at Austin has compiled Storms’ LENR work through 2015.

Edmund Storms discusses some of the episodes of history, like the Les Case experiment, as well as the progress in LENR theory and the difference between Super Abundant Vacancies SAVs and Nano-spaces as a nuclear active environment.

Listen to the Cold Fusion Now! podcast with Ruby Carat and special guest Dr. Edmund Storms at our Podcast page https://coldfusionnow.org/cfnpodcast/ or subscribe in iTunes.


Cold Fusion Now! brings the voices of breakthrough energy scientists to the public. We need your financial support in order to continue. Go to our website at coldfusionnow.org/sponsors/ to be a Cold Fusion Now! SuSteamer or sign-up on Patreon.

Patreon is a platform for financially supporting the creative . You can pledge as little as a dollar per episode and cap your monthly spending. When we deliver, you reward the work!

Visit us on Patreon to sign-up and become a Patron!

 


LENR-forum poll and CFN “I’m Hot!” awards

LENR-forum has a poll on the “best LENR science news” of 2018 which you can vote on here.

Cold Fusion Now! voted, and here, we share our perceived top achievements in slightly different distinct categories of science, engineering, and news, for the “2018 I’M HOT!” award. We say “perceived” as the CMNS field is wrought with secrecy as advances are made in labs cluttered with NDAs. Programs have developed around the globe, and there is more LENR activity than ever, but little hard news about results or funding.

We give a nod to those who have published and revealed publicly what they have achieved in 2018 in regards to Science, Engineering and News.

“Science” refers to research focused on determining the basic parameters of a LENR experiment.

“Engineering” refers to developments concentrated on producing excess heat expressly for commercial purposes.

“News” refers to announcements or stories that have the potential to provide science or engineering results in the future.

BEST SCIENCE Clean Planet-Tohoku-et al.

The collaborations between academia and industry in Japan have been producing results that have brought LENR into the mainstream of science through the actual facts of Reproduction. A two-year collaboration between Clean Planet Inc, Technova, and Tohoku University, and a host of other universities on the island, on excess heat experiments using similar cells and the same cathode materials, have produced results with similar output profiles. A willingness to publish these increasingly “hotter” results, and the scope of the cooperation, puts this group of researchers in the top spot for 2018 I’m Hot! Science Award.

BEST ENGINEERING Brillouin Energy Corporation

There are few labs whose sole purpose is to engineer a commercial product, but only one that has followed the prescribed steps of evaluation by a recognized independent lab with public distribution of the technical reports, and that is Brillouin Energy Corporation. The verification of the Brillouin Hot Tube by SRI International was confirmed by two seperate technical reports, the one this year announcing a doubling of the thermal output over the previous report. Their ability to swap out reactor cores and obtain the same outcomes is the result of a focus on engineering cores to specifications that have recently bumped thermal excess to 50 Watts, equating to twice the heat input. Doing the hard work in the full view of their investors, and laying bare the results for the public, puts this group of engineers in the top spot for 2018 I’m Hot! Engineering Award.

BEST NEW STORY GEC-NASA GRC Agreement

This year Global Energy Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center entered into an agreement to develop a 10kW Genie power generator based on the previously patented hybrid fusion-fission reactor which uses LENR-generated neutrons to activate fissionable material – “a natural abundance uranium deuteride fuel element”, eliminating the need for plutonium. While NASA has dabbled in LENR off-and-on since the 1990s, this agreement for development is a new level of cooperation that brings the US agency together with a private corporation long involved in LENR research. If they are successful, the reactor would provide a cleaner alternative to conventional fission, making another useful application of the LENR reaction. For this announcement, we give GEC-NASA the 2018 I’m Hot! News Award.

2019 will mark 30-years of research in the field that Drs. Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons discovered in 1989. As labs build upon hard-won successes incrementally, we are approaching the point where replication is the norm, and results are repeatable.

It’s anyone’s guess when mainstream science will turn attention towards this solution to our energy problems. However, the knowledge and skills built up the CMNS community are indispensable to bringing this science to a technology, and the increasing collaboration between LENR scientists and mainstream institutions shows resources in CMNS being drafted for that experience.

2018 shows how productive that cooperation can be.

Take your vote on the Best of 2018 at the LENR-forum poll here.