Andrea Rossi describes his Ecat steam generator now being developed in labs in Bologna, Italy and Miami, Florida in a Swedish TV show “The World of Science”. While the video is in Swedish, Rossi describes his work in English.

Here is an annotated video with English subtitles from Hampus Ericsson via E-catworld:

New! Version with English sub-titles:

Close-ups of the 1 MW plant are shown in the Bologna lab. A 10 kilowatt experimental steam unit wrapped in insulation having the size of a large microwave oven is shown, though the core unit is a significantly smaller flat box centered in the interior as modeled by an animation.

The control panel for the Ecat is shown in the still image from the video at the top of this page. Rossi says the unit runs for a couple of hours, and he hopes to “maintain a temperature of about 600 degrees C”.

Classic video of cold fusion electrolytic cells are shown, as are some animations depicting hot fusion reactions, though there is a computer graphic model of a nickel metallic matrix infused with hydrogen. Hot fusion reactions based on overcoming the Coulomb barrier through collision dominate conventional theory, but have little to do with cold fusion, also called low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR), lattice-assisted nuclear reactions (LANR), and quantum fusion.

Ecat reporter for NYTeknik Matts Lewan is interviewed, as are multiple Swedish and European scientists asked to comment on the technology, including physicist and Defkalion-associate Christos Stremmenos. NASA’s Joseph Zawodny in interviewed stating the reasons that the U.S. space agency is accelerating their research into LENR.

Video clips from the Ecat conference held this past summer are also included as well as video of Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, which appears to be from the 1994 documentary Too Close To The Sun.

A Swedish reader of E-catworld.com composed a transcript which you can find here:
http://www.e-catworld.com/2012/12/english-transcript-of-svt-cold-fusion-program/