In Japan, Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant is continuing to generate radioactively contaminated water and leak it out.   On September 10, 2013, the Ministerial Meeting on Contaminated Water and Decommissioning Issues discussed “Policies and Concrete Actions for Addressing the Contaminated Water and Decommissioning Issues”, and concluded that a team to collect expertise from all over the world and to invite proposals of countermeasures would be established.  (The detail is here in English.)

The issued Request for Information (RFI) was closed on October 23.  The overview of result of RFI is here in English.  The number of proposals submitted is 779 and they are published as PDF files in here in Japanese.  (Some proposals from overseas are written in English.)

removing radioactive particles from the earth

removing radioactive particles from the earth

A few proposals seem to be based on LENR or LENT (Low Energy Nuclear Transmutation).  For example, Dr. Shin Iwasaki proposed LENT technology by nano silver particles (No.210 and No.211) which I have introduced at here.

Another LENT technology described in No.396 (in Japanese) is very interesting and may attract LENR watchers’ attention.  This is proposed by JAPAN TECHNO CO., LTD.  The company is famous for OHMASA-GAS that is very stable and easy storable oxygen and hydrogen mixed gas.  OHMASA-GAS was featured in NHK WORLD NEWSLINE as here.

OHMASA-GAS is generated by electrolysis while the water is being stirred by “super vibration” wings.  No.396 is related with the super vibration in water but not related with OHMASA-GAS itself.

JAPAN TECHNO claims that the super vibration in water generates many nano bubbles which cause nuclear transmutation.  As the result, radioactive materials, for example radioactive cesium, are transmuted to non-radioactive materials.  While the paper of No.396 does not describe detail, Dr. Ryushin Ohmasa, the president of JAPAN TECHNO, seems to be very confident because he got the result of elementary analysis of contaminated water before and after the super vibration when I talked to him.

In this context, a very interesting patent application was applied on July 27, 2007 in Japan by Dr. Ohmasa.  (The Japanese patent application is published here.)

In the application, Dr. Ohmasa claimed that over 100 Hz vibration to water for over 100 hour caused increase of Mg, Zn, Ca, Al, Cu, Na, K and Se in the water.  The following table shows the result of ICP Mass Spectrometry of pure water before and after the vibration in 200 hours.

(unit: ppb) Mg Al Se Cu Zn Na Ca K
1st experiment
Pure Water
Before Vibration
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.11 0.12 0.00
Pure Water
After Vibration
583.47 6.30 0.36 6.74 133.44 3.53 12.17 1.84
2nd experiment
Pure Water
Before Vibration
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.14 0.00 0.02
Pure Water
After Vibration
621.29 7.48 0.97 7.33 147.35 4.36 8.85 1.94

 

This phenomenon is very interesting and one of hopes that can decontaminate huge radioactive water.  I hope the committee will study seriously the phenomenon and technology.

Cold Fusion Now!

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5 thoughts on “LENT of radioactive materials by super vibration

  1. Maybe this worldwide crisis will open their eyes? I doubt it. I am coming to the conclusion that humanity is doomed by their wilfull blindness.
    I am reading Morphic Resonance by Rupert Sheldrake and there IS a direction to evolution. I give thanks to God for this heresy.
    What or whoever takes over from us will be more capable, not less.

    • Arthur Robey, good to see you say “I am reading Morphic Resonance by Rupert Sheldrake” it must be remembered that this theory has been around for many years and many of us none scientists with logical open-minds and who search only for the Truth have seen its merits and value from the beginning.
      Right or wrong it is a good theory that answers many questions that conventional reductionist science just ignores and runs away from.
      Slowly some scientists are beginning I think to practice “Science” that means in all cases, to search only for the Truth, disregarding completely, if that Truth fits one’s own or others personal biases or religious leanings.
      When all of science is only searching for the Truth then surprisingly we may begin to find the “Truth” rather than ridiculous research and beliefs etc. being based on nothing but incompetent and corrupt “expert opinion” preached to the scientific masses from above as if coming from the holy inquisition.

  2. This is a valuable posting. The focus on LENR as a transmutation phenomenon has not been sufficiently paraded before the public. Perhaps the critics who said “it’s not fusion” were right. It may be simply: transmutation! Equally astounding.

  3. What is clearly needed is an immediate experiment (as above) but with water from Fukushima… Let’s see the before and after as soon as possible. This potential application is urgently needed, as long as it doesn’t encourage us to disregard the danger of continuing to use hot fission/fusion strategies for energy production.

  4. In light of nuclear industry problems, the transmutation to benign elements may be the most important LENR Energy technology to develop.

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    Cesium-137: A Deadly Hazard
    http://large.stanford.edu/courses/2012/ph241/wessells1/
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    Colin Wessells – March 20, 2012
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    Submitted as coursework for PH241, Stanford University, Winter 2012
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    Introduction
    .
    Among the many fission product nuclides, cesium 137 deserves attention because it possesses a unique combination of physical properties and historical notoriety. It is readily produced in large quantities during fission, has an intermediate half-life, decays by high-energy pathways, and is chemically reactive and highly soluble. These physical properties have made cesium 137 a dangerous legacy of major nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl, but it has also caused relatively small incidents as well.
    .
    The Dangers of Cesium-137
    .
    Cesium-137 is among the most common heavy fission products. Fission of various isotopes of thorium, uranium, and plutonium all yield about 6% cesium-137. [1] This high fission yield results in an abundance of cesium-137 in spent nuclear fuel, as well as in regions contaminated by fission byproducts after nuclear accidents. [2] The large quantities of cesium-137 produced during fission events pose a persistent hazard. Its half-life of about 30 years is long enough that objects and regions contaminated by cesium-137 remain dangerous to humans for a generation or more, but it is short enough to ensure that even relatively small quantities of cesium-137 release dangerous doses of radiation (its specific radioactivity is 3.2 × 1012 Bq/g). [2-4]
    .
    Along with its intermediate half-life, a combination of high-energy radioactivity and chemical reactivity makes cesium-137 a particularly dangerous fission product. Cesium-137 undergoes high-energy beta decay, primarily to an excited nuclear isomer of Barium 137, which in turn undergoes gamma decay with a half-life of about 150 seconds. [4] The energies of both the beta decay of cesium-137 and the subsequent gamma decay of the excited barium 137 are 512 keV and 662 keV, respectively. [4] In addition, cesium is much more chemically reactive than many of the transition metal fission products. As a group 1 alkaline metal, elemental cesium is quite electropositive, and is readily oxidized by water, forming highly soluble Cs+. [5] For this reason, elemental cesium-137 may contaminate large volumes of water during nuclear accidents, which are difficult to contain or process. [6]
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    Despite its prevalence in spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste, cesium-137 is actually extremely rare. Its half-life is too short for it to persist from natural fission sources, and on earth it is a synthetic isotope only.
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    Should further nuclear accidents be avoided, the dangers of cesium-137 will eventually cease.
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    Radioisotopes in the Ocean – What’s there? How much? How long?
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    By David Pacchioli – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    http://www.whoi.edu/cms/files/Radioisotopes_in_the_Ocean_167804.pdf
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    The release of radioisotopes from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 amounts to the largest-ever accidental release of radiation to the ocean. It came mostly in the form of iodine-131, cesium-134 and cesium-137, the primary radioisotopes released from the reactors. All of these substances can cause long-term health problems, said Buesseler, but iodine-131 has a half-life of just eight days and so would be effectively gone from the environment in a matter of weeks. It was cesium-134 and cesium-137, with their half-lives of two and 30 years, respectively, which would remain in the ocean for years and decades to come.
    .
    In fact, most of the cesium present in today’s oceans, Buesseler noted, is a remnant of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing conducted by the United States, France, and Great Britain during the 1950s and ’60s. Lesser amounts are attributable to the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 and to local sources, such as the dumping of low-level waste from England’s Sellafield nuclear facility into the Irish Sea.
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    Prior to Fukushima, however, the levels of cesium-137 off the coast of Japan, as cataloged by Michio Aoyama at the Meteorological Research Institute in Japan and others, were among the world’s lowest, at around 2 becquerels per cubic meter (1 becquerel, or Bq, equals one radioactive decay event per second). Against this background, the concentrations measured in early April of 2011 were all the more alarming.
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    Fukushima Daiichi Cs 137 Dispersion Model from NOAA – Published on Aug 30, 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnP5t_PaxOQ&feature=share
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    The simulation from NOAA’s HYSPLIT model shows a continuous release of tracer particles at a rate of 100 per hour representing the Cesium-137 emitted from Fukushima Daiichi. Each change in particle color (red, orange, yellow, cyan, green, blue, violet, magenta) represents a decrease in radioactivity by a factor of 10. Radioactivity decreases only due to wet and dry deposition. Decay is not a factor for Cesium in this short duration simulation compared to its long-half life. The air concentration would be computed from the particle density so it is only partially related to the color scale. Emissions occurred from 12-31 March, but the particles are followed through the end of April using meteorological data from the 1-degree resolution NOAA global analyses. The maximum cesium emissions on March 15th are shown by the red color and represent a particle activity of 5E+12 Bq.
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    More information about how this modeling was done can be found at: http://polar.ncep.noaa.gov/global/tra
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    At Lattice Energy LLC, the Widom Larson theorists keep us abreast of developments by Toyota and Mitsubishi LENR Energy engineers in the transmutation of Cesium 137 to non-radioactive Praseodymium.
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    Lattice Energy LLC- Toyota Confirms Mitsubishi Transmutation of Cs to Pr-Oct 31 2013
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    http://www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/lattice-energy-llc-toyota-confirms-mitsubishi-transmutation-of-cs-to-proct-31-2013
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    Praseodymium
    Chemical Element
    Praseodymium is a chemical element that has the symbol Pr and atomic number 59. Praseodymium is a soft, silvery, malleable and ductile metal in the lanthanide group.
    Symbol: Pr
    Electron configuration: Xe 4f3 6s2
    Atomic number: 59
    Discovered: 1885
    Melting point: 1,708°F (930.8°C)
    Van der Waals radius: 247 pm
    Atomic mass: 140.90765 ± 0.00002 u
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    Uses of praseodymium:
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    As an alloying agent with magnesium to create high-strength metals that are used in aircraft engines.
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    Praseodymium made up 5 percent of the traditional version of mischmetal.
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    Praseodymium is present in the rare earth mixture whose fluoride forms the core of carbon arc lights which are used in the motion picture industry for studio lighting and projector lights.
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    Praseodymium compounds give glasses and enamels a yellow color.
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    Praseodymium is used to color cubic zirconia yellow-green, to simulate the mineral peridot.
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    Praseodymium is a component of didymium glass, which is used to make certain types of welder’s and glass blower’s goggles.
    .
    Silicate crystals doped with praseodymium ions have been used to slow a light pulse down to a few hundred meters per second.
    .
    Praseodymium alloyed with nickel (PrNi5) has such a strong magnetocaloric effect that it has allowed scientists to approach within one thousandth of a degree of absolute zero.
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    Doping praseodymium in fluoride glass allows it to be used as a single mode fiber optical amplifier.
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    Praseodymium oxide in solid solution with ceria, or with ceria-zirconia, have been used as oxidation catalysts.
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    Modern ferrocerium firesteel products, commonly referred to as “flint”, used in lighters, torch strikers, “flint and steel” fire starters, etc., contain around 4% praseodymium.

    Part of the Lanthanide Group of Metals

    Lan­thanum 57 La
    Cerium 58 Ce
    Praseo­dymium 59 Pr
    Neo­dymium 60 Nd
    Prome­thium 61 Pm
    Sama­rium 62 Sm
    Europ­ium 63 Eu
    Gadolin­ium 64 Gd
    Ter­bium 65 Tb
    Dyspro­sium 66 Dy
    Hol­mium 67 Ho
    Erbium 68 Er
    Thulium 69 Tm
    Ytter­bium 70 Yb
    Lute­tium 71 Lu

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