Vladimir Vysotskii on the Cold Fusion Now! podcast

Dr. Vladimir I. Vysotskii is a Nuclear Physicist and Head of Theoretical Radiophysics Department at Kiev National Shevchenko University, Ukraine. He received a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from Kiev Institute of Theoretical physics, and a second Doctorate in Theoretical and Solid State Physics. His areas of research and applications is wide, from lasers to bio-physics.

Dr. Vysotskii’s first theoretical article in the field of cold fusion “Reactions of controlled fusion in crystal targets” was published in 1981 in the Soviet journal of Technical Physics, that is 8 years before the appearance of the term “cold fusion” giving him more than 35 years experience in this area. He participated and made presentations at the first LENR conference in 1990 in Provo at Brigham-Young University and he has subsequently participated in almost all ICCF conferences.

Dr. Vysotskii’s work in LENR is both theoretical and experimental, reporting stunning results of transmutations within living systems in a LENR environment. He is the author of many scientific books including, with Dr. Alla Kornilova, Nuclear Transmutation of Stable and Radioactive Isotopes in Biological Systems.

Listen to episode 11 with Vladimir Vysotskii and host Ruby Carat at our podcast page http://coldfusionnow.org/cfnpodcast/ or subscribe in iTunes.

Here is a transcript of our conversation with Dr. Vladimir Vysotskii: Click here for transcript.

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Edmund Storms on “Biological Transmutation”

Dr. Edmund Storms describes an application of the cold fusion effect transmutation.

A Periodic Table
A Periodic Table organizes all the matter known to humans.
Transmutation is a process of one element turning into another element which, by definition, is a reaction involving nuclear particles called protons.

Elements describe the types of matter that exist in the physical world and are organized in charts like the Periodic Table.

An atom is the smallest piece of matter that can still be called an element. Elements combine to form molecules and the matter we see around us.

The research of Ukrainian scientists, including Professors Vladimir Vysotskii and A. Kornikova, has revealed biological organisms, such as various forms of bacteria, that have the ability to initiate nuclear reactions with their environment, including radioactive materials like cesium, which they transmute to stable, non-radioactive elements.

This application may offer an avenue for ridding the planet of the thousands of tons of radioactive waste that presently pollute the planet.

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Supporting Links

Short Course on Nuclear Transmutation 16th International Conference On Condensed Matter Nuclear Science from [ISCMNS]

Successful Experiments On Utilization Of High-Activity Nuclear Waste In The Process Of Transmutation In Growing Associations Of Microbiological Cultures by V. I. Vysotskii, V. N. Shevel, A. B. Tashirev, A. A. Kornilova 2003 [.pdf from LENR.org]

Advanced transmutation processes and their application for the decontamination of radioactive nuclear wastes by A. Michrowski Proceedings 2nd International LENR Conference [.html 1996]

Biological TransmutationsBiological Transmutations by C. Lewis. Kervran 1980. Reviewed by Eugene Mallove from Infinite Energy

From the Review:
Kervran’s thesis is that the transmutation of elements, in particular by reactions among the first few dozen of the periodic table, occurs regularly in biological systems—both in microbes and in multicellular organisms such as human beings. Transmutation is inherent to biology.