Category Archives: Events

Happening this week

The 22nd Russian Conference on Cold Nuclear Transmutation of Chemical Elements and Ball Lighting is currently ongoing in Sochi, Russia.

Author Mats Lewan speaks this Friday in Brussels, Belgium.

This Saturday, a conference on LENR and other renewables convenes in Terni, Italy.

See details below.

Also, find a personal note from Dr. Peter Hagelstein as well as his presentation slides from the IEEE Meeting on “LENR Phenomenon” on the updated


22nd Russian Conference on Cold Nuclear Transmutation of Chemical Elements and Ball Lighting
Chairman of the RCCNT&BL-22 Organizing Committee
Yury Bazhutov
Vladimir Bychkov, Nikolai Samsonenko

Sept 27-October 4, 2015
Dagomys, Sochi, Krasnodar region, Russia


mats-lewan-400x400Lunch Talk at Full Circle Club

Speaker Mats Lewan
Author An Impossible Invention

Friday 2 October 12.30-2.00PM
Brussels, Belgium

Workday at Palasi de Terni

LENR and Other Renewables

October 3, 2015 09:30
Palasi of Terni, Italy


Find all upcoming LENR events at Cold Fusion Now!

IEEE Meeting on “LENR Phenomenon” well attended

The IEEE Meeting on “LENR Phenomena and Potential Applications” with Professor Peter Hagelstein and Dr. Louis DeChiaro was on Sept. 23 at Teradyne in North Reading, Massachusetts.

It was sponsored by the Boston Reliability Chapter and ESD Group (Electro-Static Discharge).

LENRIA attended and captured these photos.

“The meeting registration had reached capacity and online registration had been closed,” said Steve Katinsky. “There were about 62 pre-registered, and 52 in attendance.”

Dr. Peter Hagelstein’s presentation slides for his talk Research issues associated with excess heat in the Fleischmann-Pons experiment are

Dr. Louis DeChiaro“s presentation slides are here.

Dr. Louis DeChiaro presenting:
Lou and IEEE Sign1

Dr. Mitchell Swartz and Dr. Louis DeChiaro facing:
Lou and Mitchell2

Professor Peter Hagelstein and Mitchell Swartz in the foreground:
Peter Background, Mitchell Foreground3

Dr. Brian Ahern on bottom left of the meeting room:
Room Shot II Brian Ahern, Peter4

The meeting room:
Room Shot II5

Next LENR Event:

ras22nd Russian Conference on Cold Nuclear Transmutation of Chemical Elements and Ball Lighting

Chairman of the RCCNT&BL-22 Organizing Committee Yury Bazhutov

Vice-Chairmen Vladimir Bychkov, Nikolai Samsonenko
Sept 27-October 4, 2015

Dagomys, Sochi, Krasnodar region, Russia

See all Upcoming Events here.

Next two months packed with LENR/AHE science

There are four LENR/AHE meetings – over the next two months!

US, Russia, Switzerland, and France – Can you make it???

See this listing on our new Upcoming Events page, too.

IEEE Meeting at Teradyne

LENR Phenomena and Potential Applications
Professor Peter Hagelstein and Dr. Louis DeChiaro

Wednesday Sept. 23, 2015 05:30PM to 08:15PM (US/Eastern)
North Reading, Massachusetts, US


22nd Russian Conference on Cold Nuclear Transmutation of Chemical Elements and Ball Lighting
Chairman of the RCCNT&BL-22 Organizing Committee
Yury Bazhutov
Vladimir Bychkov, Nikolai Samsonenko

Sept 27-October 4, 2015
Dagomys, Sochi, Krasnodar region, Russia


Seminar at CERN

The anomalous heat effect on D/H loaded Palladium: Exploration at an atomic level, preliminary perturbed angular correlations studies
by Juliana Schell, Vittorio Violante, Graham K. Hubler
and Collaborators: Moustapha Thioye, Jinghao He, João G. M. Correia, Iberê R. S. Junior, Izabela T. Matos, Michel Zoghby

Wednesday, 14 October 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30 (Europe/Zurich)
Geneva, Switzerland

Abstract [.pdf]




AIRBUS_Group_3D_Blue_RGB.2015-01-16-09-20-05Workshop at Airbus

11th International Workshop on Anomalies in 
Hydrogen Loaded Metals
Conference Chair Jean-François Geneste
Organizing Committee W. Collis, J.D. Vinko, S.Valin-Le-Gouellec, M.Valat

Thursday and Friday, 15-16 October, 2015
Toulouse, France

To list an Event, contact Ruby Carat at

Thoughts on Attending ICCF-19 in Padua by David French

The Need for Experiments

It’s been just 3 weeks since ICCF-19 concluded in Padua and one week since my return. I’ve been asked many times what I learned at this event and what was important.

Of course, that question is unfair: many important things occurred in the course of the week. I may not have actually appreciated the main significance of a good number of them. But for me, a highlight was seeing Dr. Alexander Parkhomov in person and watching his courageous response to the barrage of questions he received as he stood at his poster, his granddaughter by his side acting as interpreter.

Dr. Parkhomov delivered a Christmas gift to the world on December 25, 2014 when he published the video of his boiling-water demonstration of a Cold Fusion effect. Far too many words have been devoted on the Internet, such as on CMNS Google group chat site to the uncertain interpretation of the temperature measurements that he reported as being associated with this experiment. He reported, in fact, boiling water away to produce steam at a rate that maximized out at 2.74 to 1 over the amount of electrical energy that he was supplying to his unit. He did this with his ceramic stick version a ceramic “dog bone” reactor (using Rossi nomenclature) which glowed yellow hot at 1100° in his video (at 149:30 minutes into the first video). Notwithstanding the diversion on CMNS over his temperature measurements (the temperature profile that he reported over the time of his experiment), I’m still convinced that his 2+ to 1 measurement of energy as based on replacing boiling water, even if he did it with the kitchen measuring cup, is the most important event to have occurred in the past year.

Dr. Parkhomov was endeavoring to replicate the experiments done under the guidance of Andrea Rossi at Lugano, Switzerland in March, 2014, reported in October, 2014 by observers from Sweden. But Rossi never disclosed what his “magical ingredients” were. Dr. Parkhomov was quite open: powdered nickel and lithium aluminum hydride – LAlH4.

I largely accepted and believed the video that was posted on the Internet and the associated information provided by Dr. Parkhomov both at the time that it was released and subsequently. In contrast, others persisted in casting doubts on this entire demonstration because of the temperature data that had been provided. However, for me seeing this humble 70-year-old retired physicist from Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia answering questions, answering the barrage of questions at ICCF-19 through the assistance of his very talented granddaughter validated in my mind that there was no fraud or mistake here. This was a genuine scientist who’d made a great step forward. For me this was the most important event that occurred at ICCF-19. I’m glad that Dr Parkhomov was honored by having, at his request, attendees assemble around his poster to pose questions to him.

Here’s my agenda: I think that the field needs to pursue new, focused and creative experiments that will lift the veil on this ColdFusion/LENR Mystery. Numerous experiments have been done in the past 26 years and there’s still no theory to explain the “magical” excess heat effect. Yes, there is a need for theoretical review, and the secret that everyone is seeking might be hidden in the 26 years of research reports that have issued. But, in my view, there needs to be a focus on new experiments that will lift the veil. The Martin Fleischmann Memorial Project is pursuing this objective.

Recently I tried to describe to a Cold Fusion enthusiast and friend how I would take the Parkhomov arrangement and introduce variants that would help elucidate what is going on. Here’s what I propose:

1) turn the apparatus so that it’s oriented vertically, particularly the pressure chamber containing the powdered nickel and the metal hydride
2) surround and contain the pressure vessel with a highly insulative environment. If necessary, employ a Dewar vacuum flask or other arrangement appropriately modified to tolerate containing an internal temperature of 1400°C.
3) Stack the materials in the pressure containment vessel so that they are vertically separated. For example, the powdered nickel could be on a higher platform and the lithium aluminum hydride could be on a lower platform.
4) This entire structure is going to be raised to a temperature of 1100° – 1300°C. This can be achieved, optionally as was done by Dr Parkhomov, by enclosing the pressure vessel in a ceramic cylinder and wrapping heater wire around the cylinder. Alternately, the heater wire could be wrapped on a cage of support material, e.g. glass rods, or even multiple narrow panels of Mica. Another heat loss control arrangement, along with a wide-mouthed Dewar flask, could include multiple sheet metal cylinders surrounding the red hot core. If the pressure vessel were in the form of a cylinder with a cylindrical pipe in the core, heat could be provided from this inner core. Howsoever done, external heating must be provided. But heat should be free to escape only at the top.
5) Measuring the heat emitted could be obtained by a variety of calorimetry methods, but I like the boiling water variant.
6) The 1st experiment would be to see whether separating the metal hydride from the nickel powder affects the excess heat that we expect to be generated.
7) As an alternative other solid-state sources of hydrogen could be placed on the lower shelf to serve as a source of hydrogen. If excess heat still arises we could conclude that lithium is not essential for this effect to occur. Other sources of hydrogen could include magnesium hydride – MgH2; calcium hydride – CaH2; sodium borohydride -NaBH4 as examples. This will establish whether the lithium or aluminum is an important part of the reaction.
8) Some of these metals, e.g. lithium may have a significant vapor pressure sufficient to expose lithium vapor to the powdered nickel. Placing a Palladium hydrogen filter disk between the higher and lower platforms would allow only hydrogen to access the nickel.
9) Once it’s established that an excess heat effect is occurring, many parameters could be varied to learn the response of the excess heat effect to:
a) the temperature of the pressure vessel, including the temperature of onset for the formation of excess heat and the effect of the rate of increase in temperature;
b) the amount/pressure of hydrogen gas in the pressure vessel, once released from the metal hydride;
c) the role, if any, of collateral metals , including not only metal components of the hydrogen emitting hydride, but also additional metals that can be mixed with the powdered nickel or be allowed to contact the nickel as a vapor;
d) the role, if any, of the use of an electrical heater that may emit magnetic fields and may be operated in either AC or DC mode; alternate heating, e.g. natural gas may be employed, fed through a central tube lined with a catalyst;
e) the substitution of other powdered or finely divided metals for the nickel powder (Palladium is an obvious 1st example, followed by titanium);
f) the substitution of deuterium gas for the initial hydrogen used to establish an excess heat effect; and
g) other variants as a fertile imagination may suggest.

Some people may be objecting: “Where’s the calorimetry?” Or more typically: “Where are the highly accurate measurements?” The point is that the boiling water method of heat measurement is totally satisfactory to validate whether an excess heat event is occurring. Once the coefficients of performance – COP – are well above 1:1 it is not necessarily to quibble about accuracy. Purists may wish to circulate water at a constant temperature in a chamber mounted above the heat source and weigh the amount of water associated with a stabilized temperature elevation. If the side walls and bottom of the reactor are extremely well insulated, this should provide the accuracy that so many insist must be achieved.

Some may say that the Parkhomov’s demonstration is just a reflection of the earlier work of Andrea Rossi. But that is not the best observation to make at this time. When such observations are made, even if true, they simply act as a diversion from discussing the key issue. The key issue is:

What experiments can be done that will lift the veil on the ColdFusion/LENR process?

Let’s stay focused on this central issue! Meanwhile ……

Dr Alexander G Parkhomov deserves credit for having openly and publicly shared his experiment and results with the World. Rossi, even if he may have been first to achieve similar effects, has always maintained a degree of secrecy around his process. If this results in Rossi getting a head start in the marketplace then his reward will be the profits that he will reap from that head start. Meanwhile, I give credit to a retired physics professor from Russia who showed both imagination and generosity in sharing a major advance in this field for the benefit of humanity.

David J French

David French is a retired patent attorney and the principal and CEO of Second Counsel Services. Second Counsel provides guidance for companies that wish to improve their management of Intellectual Property. For more information visit:

ICCF-19 start of “new cycle”

iccf-19-button3The 19th International Conference on Cold Fusion has closed and attendees are arriving back home.

“There were many high points,” said Michael McKubre, who spoke at the conference on Cold Fusion for CMNS Present and Projected Future Status.

Steve Katinsky, one of the leaders in the formation of the new LENR Industry Association said, “I would describe an undercurrent of anticipation.”

“Though this is only my third ICCF conference, something intangible was different in Padua,” Katinsky said. “While it is hard to know for sure, perhaps it is the precursor to a tipping point, and a subsequent acceleration of resources and activities in the field.”

Michael McKubre wrote a history of the ICCF conferences for the event, now archived on ICCF19 website. “I wrote the conference histories in groups of three for practical reasons, but these blocks do cycle progressively in tone. ICCF19 was the start of a new cycle and definitely felt that way.”

“I keep fairly abreast of technical progress, so for me the positive results of all conferences, except the first few, have mostly been the aspects of interpersonal bonding and team building. For this conference, with many newcomers, a major benefit was the possibility to get to know members of the next generation,” he said.

Technical talks paired with policy-making

David J. Nagel speaking at the 2014 CF/LANR Colloquium
David J. Nagel speaking at the 2014 CF/LANR Colloquium
“Scientists are generally interested in the practical aspects of LENR, and entrepreneurs want to understand the science,” said David Nagel, formerly of the Naval Research Lab and currently a professor at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. who spoke on High Power Density Events in Lattice-Enabled LENR Experiments and Generators.

He found the talks on “materials from Coolescence, SKINR and ENEA to be very good. Much progress has been made on understanding experimental procedures to achieve high loading of deuterons into Pd,” he said.

The detailed schedule is posted here.

Katinsky agreed, “The talks and posters overall were very good.”

Mitchell Swartz’s work that Peter Hagelstein presented in Padua always captures my imagination. David Kidwell in his Q&A talked about having too much He4, and I would like to hear more about that, and I was intrigued by Mark Davidson’s presentation.”

Dr. Mitchell Swartz, JET Energy and Steve Katinsky, LENRIA at ICCF-18 Banquet
Dr. Mitchell Swartz, JET Energy and Steve Katinsky, LENRIA at ICCF-18 Banquet 2013
“For me, in addition to a great range of scientific reports, were the talks of Tom Darden and Mike McKubre.”

Katinsky said, “There was both formal presentations and posters, and informal conversations and socializing; that together made for a very rewarding conference experience.”

LENR Industry Association is forming

Conversations with Steve Katinsky about the new LENR Industrial Association (LENRIA) were both very productive and pleasant,” Nagel said. “We get a lot done when we can talk.”

Katinsky added, “We had many requests for slides and information on membership, for when it opens. While commercial activity is nascent, this is the right time to get started.”

Asked how they will move forward from here, Katinsky replied, “We are close to having our initial web site up, where people and companies can register to be notified when membership opens. Also, many of the materials we have developed in support of forming the association shall be available there. Next, our efforts shall turn to seeking contributions to help with costs, and to developing our membership and some initial services.”

“Our formation of LENRIA might be somewhat early,” said Nagel, “but that, if so, is wrong in the right direction.”

Biggest crowd yet

A relatively large number of people attended, although the final count is now available yet.

Nagel said, “I also had a good conversation with Lowell Wood, an old friend from Livermore, who has followed this field for many years.”

Dr. Vittorio Violante and Dr. Michael McKubre both presented at European Parliament ITRE meeting in June 2013.
Dr. Vittorio Violante and Dr. Michael McKubre both presented at European Parliament ITRE meeting.
Lowell Wood attended ENEA Labs with Bill Gates and entourage when they were educated on the latest science by Vittorio Violante.

Katinsky liked “having the opportunity to get to know better the journalist Mats Lewan, Mike Nelson from NASA, Robert Godes of Brillouin Energy Corporation, David Kidwell of NRL and Mel Miles.

“The Great Hall was exquisite and the Orchestral start was sublime,” said McKubre.

However, the large room lacked intimacy.

“There was large attendance in an even larger hall that diminished speaker – audience connection. Overall there was a conspicuous absence of in-depth discussion and the configuration and acoustics were not particular;y conducive.”

“A lot of original attendees were prevented from attending by age or worse, and a lot of new faces were present. Obviously the presence of many new faces is only good but it meant that many old questions needed to be asked and answered again.”

Open Power collaborated with MFMP in Parkhomov Padua

One group had wanted to present their work to the community, but were not able to be scheduled in the program.

Luciano Saporito of the Open Power Association said, “We are ready to talk about our work everywhere we will have invitation: but our patent speaks for itself…”

“We are engaged in experiments,” said Ugo Abundo, a lead researcher at Open Power.

The Hydrobetatron at Open Power Lab
The Hydrobetatron at Open Power Lab
“A fundamental point of our Patent Application filed on March 10, 2015 (the importance of lithium) is enjoying numerous confirmations in the recent period, with the reports about E-cat to the replications of Parkomov, and so on, as cited in our short article (

Nevertheless, Open Power participated.

“In perfect style of Open collaboration, we contributed along with MFMP during a Parkomov replication at Padua during the Conference.”

“As Bob Greenyer said: ‘We would very much like to work together with you again. I was VERY impressed with the willingness to help in Italy in general.'”

What’s next?

The results of the conference remain to be seen, but participants are going home with a big to-do list.

“From here it is a short step to victory,” says McKubre. “Resources are entering the field. If we can find some commonality of action to ensure that the sum is greater than the parts then we will all win. I am highly encouraged.”

“One of the highlights of ICCF19 definitely was ICCF20. With the next continental rotation returning to Asia (and Oceania) it was surprising and unprecedented that four countries were seriously interested in hosting the next conference: China, Japan, India, Russia.”

“The IAC was faced with the happy need to make the diplomatic decision to hold the primary conference at Tohoku University in Sendai, on the East Coast of Japan, with a satellite meeting follow on meeting at Xiamen University on the East Coast of China.”